Posted in Recipes

Eggnog Pancakes

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I’M BACK. After a long and inexcusable absence during which I actually cooked very little (and experimented even less) I have finally come back around with something worth sharing. Pancakes aren’t exactly a staple around here per se, but we do have them on a whim about once a month or so. Usually, as probably expected, for Saturday or Sunday brunch.

Last week I had my yearly freakout in the dairy aisle whilst grocery shopping because I love eggnog. My stomach, not so much, but I don’t care. So, naturally, I had to have some. In the days when I used to eat what I wanted with neither consequence nor guilt, I used to buy myself a small carton of eggnog as soon as it was in season along with a pint of Ben and Jerry’s vanilla ice cream. Once or twice a week, I used to put a couple rounded tablespoons of ice cream in a tiny (6 oz) orange juice glass, fill in the remaining space with eggnog, and grate fresh nutmeg on top for the most contradictory seasonal treat ever. Once in a while I also added a drizzle of Pedro Ximenez Sherry or a splash of frozen Jagermeister, omg. (For some reason I wanted to add a y’all there (“omg y’all”) but I didn’t, you’re welcome.)

The point is – if you’re like me: buying eggnog the first time you see it in a store every year while reminiscing about the good times you’ve shared, this will be right up your alley. Otherwise, it’s a nice twist on a tradition to spice up your holiday breakfast, and a good way to use up the last few drops when everyone’s had their fill.

A word of caution: please, for the love of god, make sure there are no lumps in your baking powder. Sift it. Please. For everyone’s sake. Just do it. It doesn’t take long and it’s one hundred percent worth it. I’ve gone the lazy route and wow, even the tiniest little pill of that stuff in your pancake is like a bomb going off. The contrast after the initial sweetness is enough to make some people gag. And it lingers.

That said, they’re relatively simple to make!

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Eggnog Pancakes

  • 1 1/2 cups All Purpose Flour
  • 4 teaspoons Baking Powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon Salt
  • 1/3 Cup Granulated Sugar
  • 1 1/4 Cups Eggnog
  • 1 Egg
  • 1 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • 4 Tablespoons butter – Melted
  • 1/4 teaspoon Nutmeg – Freshly Ground
  1. Preheat a griddle over medium-low heat and spray or coat lightly with vegetable oil.
  2. Sift together flour, baking powder, salt, and sugar.
  3. Add eggnog, egg, and vanilla, but don’t stir.
  4. Add melted butter to the cold eggnog mixture, then stir. Doing it this way adds tenderness and fluff to your pancakes: The cold of the eggnog makes the butter start to solidify into teeny pieces throughout the batter. When those teeny pieces of butter meet the heat of the pan, the water in the butter evaporates creating a little pocket of air, and the remaining fat adds moisture and flavor.
  5. Once combined, stir in nutmeg. The batter will be mostly smooth, but don’t go crazy if there are a few small lumps. (As long as they aren’t baking powder, which they won’t be if you sifted)
  6. Turn the griddle up to medium heat and pour the batter onto the prepared pan.
  7. Heat the pancakes until bubbles begin to form on the uncooked side (the top) and they are just firm enough to flip. Flip once and cook just until done.
  8. Serve immediately with any combination of butter, maple syrup, or apricot preserves.

Makes about 16 four-inch pancakes which can be stored frozen for up to 6 months. Simply pop into the toaster to reheat.

See you guys after Thanksgiving!

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